Prospective Marriage visa (Subclass 300)

There are several options to bring your family to Australia. If you are an Australian citizen, Australian permanent resident or eligible New Zealand citizen, you may sponsor children, ffiancés, partners and parents and to join you in Australia.

 

Prospective Marriage visa (Subclass 300)

The Prospective Marriage visa is also known as a Fiancé visa. This visa is for people who want to come to Australia to marry their prospective spouse. It is a temporary visa for 9 months. You must be outside Australia when you lodge your application and when the visa is granted. You can have the wedding in any country; the wedding doesn ot need to be in Australia. This visa allows you to work, study and apply for a Partner Visa after your marriage in Australia.

 

Source from Department of Home Affairs

Last update 7 April 2020


Partner visa (onshore) (Subclass 820 and 801)

This partner visa is for the applicants who are in Australia. Just like the above offshore partner visa, it is a two stage process.

Partner visa (Temporary) (Subclass 820)

This visa lets the de facto partner or spouse of an Australian citizen, Australian permanent resident or eligible New Zealand citizen live in Australia temporarily. 

Partner visa (Permanent) (Subclass 801)

  • This a permanent visa
  • You must hold a temporary Partner visa (subclass 820)

 

Source from Department of Home Affairs
Last update 7 April 2020


Partner visa (offshore) (Subclass 309 and 100)

This offshore partner visa is for applicants who are outside Australia. It is a two stage process. Unless you are in a long term relationship, you will lodge a permanent Partner (Migrant) visa (Subclass 100) 2 years after you lodged your temporary Partner (Provisional) visa (subclass 309). You will need to provide further documents for this assessment.

 

Partner (Provisional) visa (Subclass 309)

This visa lets the de facto partner or spouse of an Australian citizen, Australian permanent resident or eligible New Zealand citizen live in Australia temporarily. 

 

Partner (Migrant) visa (Subclass 100)

  • This a permanent visa
  • You must hold a temporary Partner visa (subclass 309)

 

Source from Department of Home Affairs
Last update 7 April 2020


Parent Visa

Parents of Australian citizens, Permanent Residents or eligible New Zealand Citizens can apply for a Parent Visa if they meet the balance of family test and can be sponsored by at least one of their children living in Australia. 

  • At least half of your children are living in Australia, or more children are living in Australia (as Australian citizens or permanent residents or eligible New Zealand citizens) than overseas; 
  • You will be sponsored by one of your children in Australia who is an Australian citizen, ‘settled’ permanent resident or eligible New Zealand citizen.

 

Non-Contributory Parent Visa
This permanent visa lets a parent of a settled Australian citizen, Australian permanent resident or eligible New Zealand citizen move to Australia.

 

Subclass 103 Parent visa

You must:

  • Be outside Australia at the time of lodgement and decision
  • Be able to obtain an assurance of support. An assurance of support assures us that you will not have to rely on government assistance after you enter Australia on this visa 

 

Subclass 804 Aged Parent visa

You must: 

Assurance of support is AUD5,000 for the main applicant and AUD2,000 for a partner. This bond will be held for a 2-year period. The bond will be requested when the visa is being assessed, which will be after a significant amount of years. Processing time is expected upto 30 years.

 

 

Contributory Parent Visa 

You can apply for a permanent visa (subclass 143), costs $47,755 per parent; or apply temporary visa (subclass 173), costs $31,930 per parent, which will let you stay for 2 years. During this 2-year period, parents may apply at any time for a permanent visa and pay the remaining charge of $15,825.

 

Subclass 143 Contributory Parent visa

You can move to or stay in Australia as a permanent resident. You must: 

 

Subclass 173 Contributory Parent (Temporary) visa

You can live in Australia for up to 2 years, and apply for a permanent Contributory Parent visa (subclass 143).

 

Assurance of support is AUD10,000 for the main applicant and for any adult secondary applicant it is AUD4,000. This bond will be held for the 10-year period.

 

 

Contributory Aged Parent Visa 

You can apply for a permanent visa (subclass 864), costs $47,755 per parent; or apply temporary visa (subclass 884), costs $31,930 per parent, which will let you stay for 2 years. During this 2-year period, parents may apply at any time for a permanent visa and pay the remaining charge of $15,825.

 

Subclass 864 Contributory Aged Parent visa

You can move to or stay in Australia as a permanent resident. You must: 

This visa will let you enrol in Australia's public health care scheme, Medicare.

 

Subclass 864 Contributory Aged Parent visa

You can live in Australia for up to 2 years, and apply for a permanent Subclass 864 Contributory Aged Parent visa.

 

Assurance of support is AUD10,000 for the main applicant and for any adult secondary applicant it is AUD4,000. This bond will be held for the 10-year period.

 

 

Source from Department of Home Affairs
Last update 7 April 2020


Sponsored Parent (Temporary) visa (subclass 870)

Sponsored Parent (Temporary) visa (subclass 870)

Once a sponsorship application is approved, a sponsored parent is able to apply for a Sponsored Parent (Temporary) visa. 

 

The visa provides parents with a new pathway to temporarily reunite with their children in Australia, while ensuring that taxpayers are not required to cover additional costs. The visa responds to community concerns about the limited number of Parent places in the migration program and associated lengthy waiting periods.

 

You can visit Australia for up to 3 or 5 years at a time and can apply for further visas to visit up to a maximum period in Australia of 10 years. However, you cannot work in Australia.

 

 

Source from Department of Home Affairs

Last update 7 April 2020